There’s no denying it at this point, mobile gaming is overshadowing both PCs and consoles when it comes to popularity and profitability, and the reason for that is simple – pretty much everybody has a smartphone these days. This, combined with the fact that a lot of mobile games are free-to-play, allows mobile gaming to pull people in much more easily than PC or console gaming can.

And though hardware may not be as big of an issue with phones as it is with PCs and consoles, there is still a variety of factors to consider when buying a phone!

Now, since “gaming phones” are officially a thing, we will be listing some of the best phones for gaming that you can get in 2020, including not only those branded as gaming phones per se, but also some mainstream budget, mid-range, and flagship models.

CategoryModelScreen SizeResolutionStorage 
Best Android Phones for Gaming6.5in720×156032/64 GB
6.3in1080×234032/64/128 GB
5.72in1440×256064 GB
6.59in1080×2340128/256/512 GB/ 1 TB
6.4in1440×3040128/512 GB/ 1 TB
Best iPhones for Gaming4.7in/5.5in750×1334
1080×1920
64/256 GB
6.1in828×179264/128/256 GB
5.8/6.51125×2436
1242×2688
64/256/512 GB

Table of ContentsHide

    Best Android Phones for Gaming

    Samsung Galaxy A20s

    Samsung Galaxy A20s

    First, we have a budget model from Samsung, and it’s the Galaxy A20. However, one look at it and you’d never guess that you were looking at a budget phone that costs less than $200 – it features a massive 6.5-inch AMOLED display with an inconspicuous teardrop notch and dual cameras. But of course, it’s not all about appearances, and what’s under the hood counts, too!

    Specifications:

    ModelSamsung Galaxy A20s
    Operating SystemAndroid 9.0 Pie
    Size6.5in
    Resolution720×1560
    Display TechnologySuper AMOLED
    CPUQualcomm Snapdragon 450
    CPU Cores4×1.8 GHz
    GPUAdreno 506
    RAM3/4 GB
    Storage32/64 GB
    MicroSD SupportUp to 1 TB
    Main Camera13 MP (wide) + 8 MP (ultrawide) + 5 MP (wide)
    Front Camera8 MP
    Battery4000 mAh
    Ports1x USB-C 1x 3.5mm headphone jack
    Dimensions163.3x 77.5x 8mm (6.43x 3.05x 0.31in)
    Weight183g (6.46 oz)

    As you can see from the table above, while the A20s might look better than a flagship from a few years ago, it is still a budget device, and both the specs and the build make this abundantly clear. However, we don’t want to make it sound like this is a bad phone. Quite the contrary, at its current price point and all the features that it has to offer, it is one of the best budget gaming phones available!

    The display, while it only boasts a 720p resolution, is still an AMOLED display with excellent color reproduction and contrast. Granted, you’ll probably notice the difference in resolution despite the relatively small screen, especially if you’re used to mobile displays with 1080p or higher resolutions. Still, if we had to choose between a 720p AMOLED and a 1080p LCD display in a budget phone, we’d go with the former, but that is a matter of taste.

    Samsung Galaxy A20s Phone

    As far as the specs are concerned, the A20 is quite solid for a sub-$200 device. The 14nm octa-core Snapdragon 450 CPU won’t exactly smoke any benchmarks but it is quite capable of running most games, though there are bound to be some performance hiccups with the more demanding ones.

    On the memory front, 3 GB of RAM is good enough for Android 9, though the base model with 32 GB of internal storage may be an issue for some users. Granted, there’s a dedicated microSD slot, but if you want to keep a lot of apps and games installed, chances are you’d prefer the 64 GB model.

    As for the cameras, there’s another unusual feature – a triple-camera setup in a sub-$200 phone. In addition to the main camera, there’s an ultrawide one and another wide-angle camera with a depth sensor. However, the performance is about what you’d expect in this price range – photos look great in good lighting, but low-light shots are grainy and not very detail-rich. Plus, the main camera can only record video in 1080p at 30 FPS.

    At the end of the day, the Galaxy A20s presents great value for those who are on a tight budget, as it combines a great display with solid hardware and excellent battery life, plus it looks great to boot, making it a very appealing handset if you want value and style.

    The Pros:

    • AMOLED display
    • High-capacity battery with fast charging
    • Triple-camera setup

    The Cons:

    • Mediocre performance
    • 720p display

    Xiaomi Redmi Note 8

    Xiaomi Redmi Note 8

    If AMOLED isn’t enough to make up for the Galaxy A20s’ unimpressive hardware, then you’ll definitely want to take a look at Xiaomi’s Redmi Note 8, a phone that really pushes the envelope when it comes to how much hardware power can be stuffed into a phone while still keeping it remarkably affordable.

    Specifications:

    ModelXiaomi Redmi Note 8
    Operating SystemAndroid 9 Pie
    Size6.3in
    Resolution1080×2340
    Display TechnologyIPS LCD
    CPUQualcomm Snapdragon 665
    CPU Cores4×2 GHz + 4×1.8 GHz
    GPUAdreno 610
    RAM3/4/6 GB
    Storage32/64/128 GB
    MicroSD SupportUp to 256 GB
    Main Camera48 MP (wide) + 8 MP (ultrawide) + 2 MP (macro) + 2 MP (depth sensor)
    Front Camera13 MP
    Battery4000 mAh
    Ports1x USB-C 1x 3.5mm headphone jack
    Dimensions158.3×75.3x 8.4mm (6.23 x 2.96 x 0.33in)
    Weight190g (6.70 oz)

    Chances are you’ve already heard about the Redmi Note series, seeing as many have been heralding these phones as some of the best choices if you’re looking to get the best bang for your buck. It’s remarkably cheap considering what’s under the hood, but it sure doesn’t feel like a cheap phone. Much like the A20s, it features a large screen, a sleek two-tone design, and a discrete teardrop notch.

    It’s about as big as the A20s, too, but instead of the 720p AMOLED display, the Redmi Note 7 boasts a 1080p IPS display that has excellent color accuracy and brightness. Naturally, the contrast isn’t as great as what you’d get with AMOLED, but it is still quite good for this type of display. And as usual, if you’re not accustomed to using AMOLED displays, you probably won’t even notice the difference.

    As for the actual performance, this phone generally has a slight edge over its competitors in this price range, and the Snapdragon 665 is quite capable of running most games without any major issues.

    On the memory front, the Redmi Note 8 comes in several versions: a base model with 32 GB of storage and 3 GB of RAM, along with 64 and 128 GB models that can have either 4 or 6 GB of RAM.

    As far as we’re concerned, going with a 64 GB option with 4 GB of RAM would probably be the best choice, as there would be ample storage space and the RAM is wholly capable of handling the current version of Android. The 32 GB version might be a bit cheaper but as we’ve mentioned with the A20s, it can get cramped very quickly. Meanwhile, a 6 GB of RAM option is only worth it if you do a lot of multitasking.

    Redmi Note 8

    Now, we get to the cameras, and no, that’s not a mistake – the Redmi Note 8 really does come with four cameras. However, on-paper specs aren’t everything, and the 48 MP sensor of the main camera performs more or less how you’d expect of a phone in this price range, all the while three additional cameras (ultrawide, macro, and depth sensor) do a decent job of enhancing photos, though the end result isn’t noticeably better than the competition.

    At the end of the day, we find the Xiaomi Redmi Note 8 to be the ultimate phone for gaming in 2020 if you’re on a limited budget and want to get the best value for your money that you can. It is by no means a perfect phone, but at its modest price point, you’d be hard-pressed to find a model that offers better value. That said, if you catch this phone at a discount, you won’t regret your investment.

    The Pros:

    • Solid 1080p display
    • Good performance
    • Great battery life
    • Remarkable value for your money

    The Cons:

    • Unimpressive camera performance

    Razer Phone 2

    Razer Phone 2

    Razer is a brand that has become synonymous with two things: gaming and high prices. So, when they announced the original Razer Phone, people pretty much knew what to expect. However, it wasn’t as expensive as some were anticipating, and neither was its “sequel”, the Razer Phone 2. Now, the Razer Phone 2 has a number of things going for it, including a very convenient price drop.

    Specifications:

    ModelRazer Phone 2
    Operating SystemAndroid 9 Pie
    Size5.72in
    Resolution1440×2560
    Display TechnologyIPS LCD
    CPUQualcomm Snapdragon 845
    CPU Cores4×2.8 GHz + 4×1.7 GHz
    GPUAdreno 630
    RAM8 GB
    Storage64 GB
    MicroSD SupportUp to 1 TB
    Main Camera12 MP (wide) + 12 MP (telephoto)
    Front Camera8 MP
    Battery4000 mAh
    Ports1x USB-C
    Dimensions158.5x 79x 8.5mm (6.24x 3.11x 0.33in)
    Weight220g (7.76oz)

    Needless to say, the Razer Phone 2 really stands out compared to most modern phones in terms of design, with its blocky frame and the noticeable “chin and forehead” which host the phone’s massive speakers. As it’s usually the case in scenarios such as this one, you will either love it or hate it.

    Now, one of the main selling points of the Razer Phone 2 is its superb QHD 120 Hz IPS display with HDR support, which is simply a full package that offers both great visuals and the kind of performance that you don’t usually see in phones these days.

    Inside, you’ll find a snappy 10nm Snapdragon 845 CPU (no pun intended) that won’t have any trouble running the latest mobile games, and the in-game and system performance is spot on as well. Add to that the 8 GB of RAM, and the Razer Phone 2 also does a great job as far as multitasking is concerned. It only comes with 64 GB of internal storage, which is something of a gold spot for Android phones at the moment since it’s easy to add extra storage with the help of memory cards.

    Razer Phone 2 Phone

    On top of that, one of the phone’s standout features are its speakers, which are way more powerful and punchier than what you usually get with modern smartphones – after all, the “forehead and chin” on the front of the phone aren’t there just for show, as mentioned above.

    Now, since this is a gaming phone, Razer kind of skimped on the cameras. They are a step up from the first Razer Phone, but still can’t quite compete with the contemporaries of the Razer Phone 2. The quality is fine but low-light shots aren’t exactly great, although we could let this slide due to the phone’s age.

    Ultimately, Razer Phone 2 is great for gamers but it’s not a very remarkable phone if we take the “gaming” out of the equation. Its main selling points in 2020 are its excellent display and powerful speakers, plus the fact that its price has dropped significantly compared to when it first launched. It launched in 2018, so Razer will probably have a new phone lined up for 2020.

    The Pros:

    • QHD 120 Hz display
    • Plenty of RAM
    • Powerful speakers

    The Cons:

    • A bit dated
    • Design won’t agree with everyone

    Asus RoG Phone II

    Asus ROG Phone 2

    Razer may have been the first to release a full-on “gaming phone” and thus kick off the trend, but it wasn’t long before others wanted a piece of that cake. As such, the Asus RoG phone came out a year later, and now we have the even better RoG Phone II.

    Specifications:

    ModelAsus RoG Phone II
    Operating SystemAndroid 9 Pie
    Size6.59in
    Resolution1080×2340
    Display TechnologyAMOLED
    CPUQualcomm Snapdragon 855+
    CPU Cores1×2.96 GHz + 3×2.42 GHz + 4×1.78 GHz
    GPUAdreno 640
    RAM8/12 GB
    Storage128/256/512 GB/1 TB
    MicroSD SupportN/A
    Main Camera48 MP (wide) + 13 MP (ultrawide)
    Front Camera24 MP
    Battery6000 mAh
    Ports3xUSB-C 1x 3.5mm headphone jack
    Dimensions171x 77.6x 9.5mm (6.73x 3.06×0.37in)
    Weight240g (8.47oz)

    As you can tell from the specs, the RoG Phone II is an absolute hardware powerhouse and its outward appearance is very characteristically RoG. It boasts an angular, aggressive design, complete with an RGB RoG logo on the back that no RoG product would be complete without.

    Now, while the original RoG phone was somewhat lagging behind Razer in regards to the display, the RoG Phone II more than catches up. The resolution isn’t QHD but we’re looking at a 120 Hz AMOLED display, and that alone is one of the greatest things about this device, but there’s more.

    The phone features a cutting-edge 7nm Snapdragon 855+ CPU which offers buttery-smooth performance, all the while it boasts a ridiculous amount of storage and RAM. It starts at 128 GB of internal storage and goes as high as 1 TB, and this does make up for the lack of microSD support. Moreover, it comes in both 8 GB and 12 GB RAM variants, but most will agree the latter is just overkill for the software that the phone is running on.

    On the camera front, the RoG Phone II boasts some rather impressive numbers in its spec sheet, but as we know, megapixels aren’t everything. Have no worries – the cameras are some of the best that you’ll find in a phone these days, offering crisp shots even in low-light conditions. Sadly, the phone doesn’t feature a telephoto lens, which we very much would have liked to see at this price point.

    Asus ROG Phone II

    Now, being a gaming phone, the Asus RoG Phone II has some extra features that are pretty much unique to it for the moment. The phone features AirTriggers that emulate controller shoulder buttons when the phone is used in landscape mode, and different functions can be mapped to these buttons.

    On top of that, you might be wondering what the extra USB-C ports are for, and the answer is: accessories! This includes a bunch of stuff like the:

    • AeroActive Cooler II, which greatly helps with heat dissipation
    • TwinView Dock II, which features another display identical to the phone’s display, essentially turning the phone into a Nintendo DS-like dual-display handheld console
    • RoG Gamepad Controller, which features a familiar button setup seen in most controllers, resembling the Nintendo Switch Lite when used with the phone
    • Desktop Dock, which essentially turns your phone into a compact gaming desktop, complete with all the ports that you’d expect to find a desktop PC

    So, all in all, it’s pretty obvious as to why the RoG Phone II is the best gaming phone currently available. However, it should also be pretty obvious as to what one of its greatest drawbacks is – the price.

    Needless to say, the phone itself is already very expensive, and the accessories (assuming that you’d want to get any of them) only add to the price. Of course, with its stunning display, excellent cameras, massive storage capacity, and the extra convenience provided by the AirTriggers, the phone alone is a top-notch gaming device while the accessories are only an added bonus.

    Ultimately, if you’re not put off by the gaudy design, or the lack of an IP rating and wireless charging in such an expensive device, then the RoG Phone II could be worth considering. However, it is obviously a niche product aimed at enthusiasts, and you’ll have to burn a fair amount of cash if you want to get the most out of it – especially if you’re thinking about getting more than one of the accessories to go with it.

    The Pros:

    • Amazing 120 Hz AMOLED display
    • Plenty of storage and RAM
    • AirTriggers
    • Various gaming accessories
    • Outstanding battery life

    The Cons:

    • Expensive
    • Design isn’t for everyone
    • No waterproof rating
    • No wireless charging

    Samsung Galaxy S10+

    Samsung Galaxy S10+

    Finally, we must mention Samsung’s superb Galaxy S10+, which is easily one of the best Android phones currently on the market. It features a brand-new notch-free design, a stunning display, and some serious hardware power.

    Specifications:

    Model

    Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus

    Operating System

    Android 9 Pie

    Size

    6.4in

    Resolution

    1440×3040

    Display Technology

    AMOLED

    CPU

    Qualcomm Snapdragon 855

    CPU Cores

    1×2.84 GHz + 3×2.42 GHz + 4×1.78 GHz

    GPU

    Adreno 640

    RAM

    8/12 GB

    Storage

    128/512 GB/ 1 TB

    MicroSD Support

    Up to 1 TB

    Main Camera

    12 MP (wide) + 12 MP (telephoto) + 16 MP (ultrawide)

    Front Camera

    10 MP + 8 MP

    Battery

    4100 mAh

    Ports

    1x USB-C

    1x 3.5mm headphone jack

    Dimensions

    157.6x 74.1×7.8mm (6.20x 2.92x 0.31in)

    Weight

    175g (6.17 oz)

     

    The Galaxy S10+ is not a major leap forward for Samsung, but it carries some notable changes and improvements that place it a clear notch above its predecessor.

    For one, there’s the new Infinity-O display which looks about as good as you’d expect from Samsung, and it comes complete with a fingerprint sensor embedded directly into the display. The camera cutout in the upper right corner may be distracting for some, especially when using apps with light backgrounds.

    The phone is powered by the Snapdragon 855, a 7nm CPU much like the one seen in the RoG Phone II. Needless to say, the performance is on point, and the 8 GB of RAM found in the 128 GB and 512 GB versions of the phone ought to be more than enough to meet the performance requirements of virtually any user. Meanwhile, the 1 TB version comes with a hefty 12 GB of RAM.

    Samsung Galaxy S10

    Moving on, the cameras are probably one of the highlights here, as the phone packs a total of five cameras: three main cameras, including both a telephoto and an ultrawide camera, plus two wide-angle cameras on the front. As you might expect, this makes the S10+ one of the top dogs in the smartphone world when cameras are concerned.

    At the end of the day, the Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus is one of the best Android phones currently available, and it is one of the best smartphones in general right now. Naturally, that also makes it a very appealing phone for gaming, especially if you have high-performance requirements.

    However, we do feel that the RoG Phone II might offer better value for your money, especially if you’re looking for a gaming phone. The S10+ is pricey and Asus’ offering simply has some great extra features that will appeal to gamers. But on the other hand, if you want a more elegant phone, the S10+ would definitely be the superior pick, despite lacking stuff like AirTriggers or a 120 Hz display.

    The Pros:

    • Stunning AMOLED display with HDR capabilities
    • Excellent camera setup
    • Great performance
    • In-display fingerprint sensor

    The Cons:

    • Expensive
    • Display isn’t 120 Hz
    • Front camera cutout might be distracting

    Best iPhones For Gaming

    iPhone 8

    iphone 8

    We kick off the second category with the iPhone 8, a phone that was rather unremarkable back when it released but one that is currently the best budget iPhone that you can get in 2020, at least until Apple rolls out a “sequel” to the aging iPhone SE.

    Specifications:

    Model

    iPhone 8

    iPhone 8 Plus

    Operating System

    iOS 13

    iOS 13

    Size

    4.7in

    5.5in

    Resolution

    750×1334

    1080×1920

    Display Technology

    Retina IPS LCD

    Retina IPS LCD

    CPU

    Apple A11 Bionic

    Apple A11 Bionic

    CPU Cores

    2×2.1 GHz + 4×1.42 GHz

    2×2.1 GHz + 4×1.42 GHz

    GPU

    Apple GPU (3-core)

    Apple GPU (3-core)

    RAM

    2 GB

    3 GB

    Storage

    64/256 GB

    64/256 GB

    MicroSD Support

    N/A

    N/A

    Main Camera

    12 MP (wide)

    12 MP + 12MP (telephoto)

    Front Camera

    7 MP

    7 MP

    Battery

    1821 mAh

    2691 mAh

    Ports

    1xLightning Port

    1xLightning Port

    Dimensions

    138.4 x67.3x 7.3mm (5.45×2.65×0.29in)

    158.4x 78.1×7.5mm (6.24×3.07x 0.30in)

    Weight

    148g (5.22oz)

    202g (7.13oz)

     

    The iPhone 8 was the last in a string of somewhat uninspired-looking iPhones that started with the iPhone 6. With a screen-to-body ratio of about 65%, it looks rather dated by today’s standards, especially since the design philosophy shifted to bezel-less so quickly, ditching the home button in the process. Still, it’s a good-looking phone with a sleek glass back, though it might look less impressive than even the mid-range Android offerings that you can find now in 2020.

    The display holds up very well, and it is Apple’s signature Retina LCD display. The resolution, obviously, differs between the regular and the Plus variant, but both have a more than adequate pixel density, not to mention that the color reproduction is spot on.

    Inside, we have Apple’s 10nm A11 Bionic CPU which still holds up remarkably well in 2020, owing in no small part due to iOS optimization and consistent long-term support. Performance is snappy and the phones come with either 64 GB or 256 GB of internal storage, all the while the Plus variant also features 3 GB of RAM – a step above the regular version’s 2 GB, but it hardly makes a significant performance difference.

    As for the cameras, which were always the iPhone’s strong point, the regular iPhone has one excellent wide-angle 12 MP camera, while the Plus variant also has an additional 12 MP telephoto lens which helps provide the image with a sense of depth that’s lacking in the regular iPhone 8. In any case, while the camera may struggle to keep up with those found in newer iPhones and newer Android flagships, the iPhone 8 is still good in this department as long as having the best camera isn’t a priority for you.

    iPhone 8 Phone

    At the end of the day, there are several reasons as to why you might want to get an iPhone 8 in 2020 and several reasons as to why you shouldn’t. As we have already mentioned, it is a great budget iOS device if you need to replace a new phone but can’t quite afford some of the pricier models, as it has pretty much all the important iOS features that you’d find in newer models.

    However, the design is quite dated by today’s standards and the battery life is very limited in the regular iPhone 8 (the Plus fares markedly better). Furthermore, Apple has an iPhone SE 2 lined up, and it should launch in early 2020. It will be based on the iPhone 8 design but will also feature updated hardware, better performance, and it would be a better long-term investment.

    That said, the iPhone 8 and the iPhone 8 Plus (especially the latter) are a solid choice if you need a new iPhone but can’t afford any of the newer models, though now might not be a good time to get one with the new budget model coming up.

    The Pros:

    • Good performance for a 2017 phone
    • Solid camera
    • Great budget iOS device

    The Cons:

    • Dated design
    • Unimpressive battery life on regular iPhone 8
    • iPhone SE 2 releasing soon

    iPhone 11

    iPhone 11

    Moving on, we have the very pleasant surprise that was the iPhone 11. In 2019, iPhone 11 was both better and cheaper than its predecessor, the iPhone Xr, which really caught many by surprise, considering how notorious Apple became with their constantly rising prices.

    Now, the iPhone 11 is by no means a cheap device (after all, the terms “cheap” and “Apple” rarely go together in a sentence) but it is a very good phone whose price tag can be deemed reasonable, making it the go-to iPhone if the premium Pro models or last year’s OLED-equipped iPhone Xs are too pricey for you.

    Specifications:

    ModeliPhone 11
    Operating SystemiOS 13
    Size6.1in
    Resolution828x 1792
    Display TechnologyLiquid Retina IPS LCD
    CPUApple A13 Bionic
    CPU Cores2×2.65 GHz + 4×1.8 GHz
    GPUApple GPU (4-core)
    RAM4 GB
    Storage64/128/256 GB
    MicroSD SupportN/A
    Main Camera12 MP (wide) + 12 MP (ultrawide)
    Front Camera12 MP
    Battery3110 mAh
    Ports1x Lightning Port
    Dimensions150.9x 75.7x 8.3mm (5.94x 2.98x 0.33in)
    Weight194 g(6.84oz)

    On the outside, the iPhone 11 looks pretty much identical to the Xr, the main differences being the new dual-camera setup and the fact that the Apple logo was moved down to the center of the phone. Not much else changed over the past two years, and it will likely be another year or two before Apple introduces any major changes to the new identity established by the iPhone X.

    The true-tone Liquid Retina display is remarkably sharp and vivid, despite the seemingly low resolution, and the internals are quite impressive too. The 7nm+ A13 chip is a true powerhouse that, when combined with the 4 GB of RAM, makes for some of the best performance ever seen in an iOS device. Moreover, it comes in 64 GB, 128 GB, and 256 GB variants.

    iPhone 11 Phone

    Now, we’ve mentioned that one of the main upgrades over the iPhone XR is the dual-camera system, so how much of a difference does it make? The second camera is an ultrawide camera rather than a telephoto one, which means better wide-angle shots but no optical zoom. The main camera itself is easily some of the best that you’ll find in a smartphone, as it captures lifelike detail even when it has to make do with poor lighting.

    Ultimately, if you’re an iOS user and aren’t interested in the premium features offered by the more expensive iPhones, the iPhone 11 has pretty much all the bases covered. It offers great performance, a good display, an excellent dual-camera setup, and it comes at a decent price – for an iPhone, at least.

    Of course, it’s not a perfect phone, and the main issue that people have with it is the lack of an OLED panel and the resolution, which is on the low side compared to the competition, though most people would be hard-pressed to notice the difference in a phone screen.

    The Pros:

    • Superb performance
    • Solid display
    • Excellent dual cameras
    • Decent price

    The Cons:

    • Display resolution is on the low side

    iPhone 11 Pro

    iPhone 11 Pro

    And finally, we get to the latest 2019 flagships, the iPhone 11 Pro and its XL counterpart, the iPhone 11 Pro Max. These two models are more or less identical, barring the obvious difference in screen and battery size, so what is it that makes it so much better than last year’s flagship and the more affordable iPhone 11?

    Specifications:

    Model

    iPhone 11 Pro

    iPhone 11 Pro Max

    Operating System

    iOS 13

    iOS 13

    Size

    5.8in

    6.5in

    Resolution

    1125×2436

    1242×2688

    Display Technology

    Super Retina XDR OLED

    Super Retina XDR OLED

    CPU

    Apple A13 Bionic

    Apple A13 Bionic

    CPU Cores

    2×2.65 GHz + 4×1.8 GHz

    2×2.65 GHz + 4×1.8 GHz

    GPU

    Apple GPU (4-core)

    Apple GPU (4-core)

    RAM

    4 GB

    4 GB

    Storage

    64/256/512 GB

    64/256/512 GB

    MicroSD Support

    N/A

    N/A

    Main Camera

    12 MP (wide) + 12 MP (ultrawide) + 12 MP (telephoto)

    12 MP (wide) + 12 MP (ultrawide) + 12 MP (telephoto)

    Front Camera

    12 MP

    12 MP

    Battery

    3046 mAh

    3969 mAh

    Ports

    1x Lightning Port

    1x Lightning Port

    Dimensions

    144x 71.4x 8.1mm (5.67x 2.81x 0.32in)              

    158×77.8×8.1mm (6.22×3.06×0.32in)

    Weight

    188g (6.63oz) 

    226g 7.97 oz)

     

    Design-wise, the most striking change about the iPhone 11 Pro is the new triple-camera setup and, much like with the regular 11 model, the Apple logo has been moved down to the center of the phone. Apart from that, it still looks like the good old iPhone X.

    Now, the first premium feature that you’ll find in the Pro is the Super Retina XDR OLED display which is brighter than the OLED display seen in the iPhone Xs, but is otherwise unchanged, still boasting beautiful color reproduction, as well as HDR and true-tone capabilities.

    iPhone 11 Pro Phone

    The CPU is the same A13 Bionic chip and 4 GB of RAM found in the regular iPhone 11, so the performance is more or less identical, so you won’t be putting extra money towards the Pro for the sake of performance.

    The cameras, however, are a different story. The iPhone 11 Pro features three 12 MP sensors – a regular wide-angle camera, an ultrawide camera, and a telephoto camera, making it one of the best camera setups that you can find in a phone right now.

    At the end of the day, the iPhone 11 Pro and its Max counterpart are great phones through and through, but sadly, the upgrade comes down to the enhanced camera performance and the OLED display, so the regular iPhone 11 might be more appealing if you’re in the iOS camp.

    The Pros:

    • Top-notch OLED display
    • Excellent performance
    • Stunning camera setup

    The Cons:

    • Expensive
    • Limited upgrade over the iPhone 11

    How To Pick The Best Phone For Your Needs

    Now that we’ve gone over some of the best smartphones that you can get in 2020, it’s time to address all the factors that might influence your decision as to which of these is the right pick for you.

    Android vs iOS

    gaming phones

    This is an age-old question. Well, more of a decade-old question, not considering that iOS was much more popular than Android devices were in the early years following the release of the original iPhone.

    Comparing these two operating systems and the devices they are available on is a bit of a tricky question in 2020 since they both have their own unique advantages and disadvantages and neither is inherently better than the other.

    Now, since this is a bit of a complex subject, you might want to check out this article where we discuss the merits and flaws of Android and iOS in greater detail.

    If we had to summarize our conclusion, it would have to be as follows:

    iOS usually offers better performance, superior long-term support, apps that generally adhere to a higher quality standard, and ultimately, iPhones may present better value in the long run due to their good reselling prices and Apple’s upgrade plans.

    On the other hand, Android allows the user a greater degree of freedom, is far more customizable, allows users access to a greater variety of apps, and perhaps most importantly, you can find an Android phone at virtually any price point.

    Finally, it should be noted that emulators are not available for iOS, whereas there are many emulators for Android, and that’s something that you should keep in mind if you would want to play some old games on your phone.

    How To Pick A Display

    OLED vs LCD

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    With phones, the display isn’t as difficult to pick as it may be with monitors and TVs. This is mainly because both the panel technology and the resolution play a far lesser role than they do in larger displays right now.

    For a long time, most phones (including flagships) utilized IPS LCD displays, although this did change recently when OLED became the new standard for high-end devices. Now, many will agree that OLED is the superior technology of the two, and for several reasons:

    1. They tend to have better color reproduction, so the colors displayed are more vibrant and seem more organic.
    2. They reflect less light, which is great news for those who spend a lot of time outdoors.
    3. They are more power-efficient. Since every pixel functions as its own light source, OLED displays do not need to constantly keep a power-hungry backlight active for as long as the display is turned on. Plus, since black is displayed by turning off individual pixels, an OLED display produces true blacks rather than dark greys, as LCDs do.

    Of course, in spite of these advantages, the main drawback of OLED panels is that they are expensive to manufacture, which is precisely why it took so long for OLED displays to become mainstream in flagship phones. OLED TVs are still very expensive, and monitors – even more so.

    The Resolution

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    How important is the resolution in a 5-inch or 6-inch display?

    Well, the resolution an important aspect to consider with every type of display, but is not as big of an issue today when all but the cheapest phones come with a 1080p display which offers pixel density that is more than satisfactory for such a small screen.

    In a phone, even 300 PPI tends to be more than sharp enough for a 5 or 6-inch screen. So, why the 400-500 PPI overkill, you might ask?

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    Well, there are two reasons.

    First, there is marketability. Ramping up the numbers in a spec sheet, even if they are fairly inconsequential specs, can make it appear better to the consumer.

    But more importantly, OLED displays have different pixel matrices, which requires an OLED display to have more pixels per inch in order to be able to maintain the kind of sharpness that you’d see in an LCD with a lot fewer pixels per inch.

    In any case, the resolution is hardly that relevant when it comes to picking a phone. Some users can tell the difference but others can’t, so it remains a very subjective question.

    How Much Internal Storage Do You Need?

    best android phones for gaming

    Today, phones can have anywhere between 8 GB and 1 TB of internal storage. However, most phones stick to the 32-256 GB range right now, so how much is enough?

    Well, in 2020, we’d say that 64 GB is the best option, at least on average. Going with 32 GB can be enough for those who don’t install too many apps and don’t have a habit of keeping too much multimedia content stored locally, but we’d still go with 64 GB as the starting point.

    Now, anything beyond 64 GB is only really necessary if you have a large music library or want to have some movies or TV shows with you on the go. If that’s not the case, you’d probably find 64 GB of internal storage to be quite sufficient.

    Furthermore, let’s not forget that internal storage isn’t necessarily all the storage that you’d get. Most Android phones support MicroSD memory cards, which is a great way to expand your phone’s storage capacity at a minimal expense. On top of that, cloud storage is more popular than ever now, and you can get considerable amounts of cloud storage for what is essentially pocket change each month.

    How Much RAM Do You Need?

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    RAM is another important hardware spec that tends to be fairly high on many people’s priority list whenever they’re shopping for a new computer, though it is not as vital for phones as it is for laptops and desktop PC.

    Mobile apps are fairly lightweight, so the amount of RAM in a phone will primarily have to do with multitasking. However, it is difficult to ascertain memory performance based on a spec sheet, as it mostly has to do with OS optimization.

    iOS devices are optimized extremely well, so even the older iPhones with as little as 2 GB of RAM can easily juggle many apps at once without dropping any of them and with no need for the RAM to be cleared every once in a while.

    Android, since it’s not as optimized and since it’s available on a wide range of hardware platforms, tends to be more RAM-hungry. As a result, Android OEMs often design their phones with more RAM, and it’s not uncommon to see models with 8 or even 12 GB of RAM today. However, we’d say that 4 GB is still quite enough, at least if you don’t do any heavy multitasking.

    Conclusion

    So, what are the best gaming phones for 2020?

    For our budget pick, we’d go with the Xiaomi Redmi Note 8, for obvious reasons – it is remarkably cheap and packs quite a punch for such an affordable device, so it is bound to appeal to those who don’t want to spend too much on a phone.

    However, as far as value is concerned, the Razer Phone 2 takes the cake. True, it might be a bit dated today, but it still holds up very well, especially when you consider just how great of a display it packs.

    Finally, the very best gaming phone is, obviously, the RoG Phone II. It may not be the perfect phone or the best phone in general, but when gaming is concerned, it is simply unrivaled, for all the reasons we’ve already listed – excellent AMOLED display, AirTriggers, and the accessories all make it a superb gaming device for those who can afford it.

    And that would be our selection of the best gaming phones that you can get in 2020! Of course, these are only our picks, so if you feel that there are any other phones out there that ought to be included on the list, let us know in the comments and we’ll see about adding them in the future.

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