The Sims 4 is – you guessed it – the fourth installment in EA’s hit The Sims series for PC. While the game giant has released several other spin-offs of the game for other platforms, such as Nintendo DS, Android, and iOS, the main games have always been primarily for PC because of their size.

Modified versions of the main game are also available for Xbox and PlayStation, but features are sometimes modified or excluded on console platforms. Expansion pack availability has varied in the past, too.

The Sims 4

About

Since The Sims 4 was released, it’s received mixed reactions from players and critics. While gameplay has expanded positively in recent years due to the number of expansion packs that have been released, gameplay was originally narrow and a bit restricted.

Players are also frustrated with EA’s propensity to box every new feature into its own expansion pack, in addition to splitting features that were once sold together into separate packs. For example, while previous installments of The Sims came with supernatural-themed expansions, with new life forms such as witches, ghosts, werewolves, and more, The Sims 4 released only vampires in their own expansion pack.

  • Release Date: September 2nd, 2014
  • Platforms: PC (Windows, macOS) PlayStation 4, Xbox One
  • Genre: Simulation
  • Developer: Maxis
  • Publisher: Electronic Arts

System Benchmarks

Minimum System Requirements

  • OS: Windows 7/8/8.1/10 (64-bit)
  • CPU: 1.8 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, AMD Athlon 64 Dual-Core 4000+ or equivalent For computers with built-in graphics chipsets: 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2.0 GHz AMD Turion 64 X2 TL-62 or equivalent)
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce 6600 or better, ATI Radeon X1300 or better, Intel GMA X4500 or better
  • HDD: 16 GB

Recommended System Requirements

  • OS: Windows 7/8/8.1/10 (64-bit)
  • CPU: Intel core i5 or faster, AMD Athlon X4
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 650 or better
  • HDD: 18 GB
The Sims 4 System Benchmarks

Optimal PC Builds

In a lot of ways, The Sims 4 is even friendlier on computers than The Sims 3 (and even The Sims 2) because of several key performance changes that EA and Maxis have made. Because sims go through a loading screen between lots and houses, the game is much more focused on the lives of one family than the lives of an entire neighborhood.

Additionally, the Create-A-Style tool, a tool which allowed you to customize the textures, materials, and colors of nearly any object in The Sims 3, was not brought back in The Sims 4. Despite how much fans enjoyed this tool, it caused a lot in the way of performance issues and slowdowns.

Of course, with Sims games, how much your computer can handle depends a lot on how much custom content you have, how many expansion packs you decide to run at one time, and how high you set your resolution (and other graphics settings). Take this from a veteran player – the minimum settings are much too low if you expect to be able to run the base game plus several expansion packs.

As such, if you’re looking to play the base game at 1080p resolution, you should be able to get by with a very affordable budget PC – even a laptop. However, the more packs you expect to install, the more you’ll want to up that performance, especially if you want to play with a higher-than-average resolution.

Most people should be able to get away with a mid-tier PC if they want to play the base game plus several expansion packs.

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